Jump to main content
Times Online
ARCHIVE CLASSIFIED SHOPPING PROMOTIONS GAMES FAST TIMES MY TIMES WEATHER
September 30 2005
Make Times Online
Your Homepage Your Bookmark
BRITAIN
London bombs
x
Politics
x
TIMES ONLINE
Home
Britain
World
Business
Money
Sport
Comment
Travel
Entertainment
Tech & Net
Law
Crossword
Driving
Property & Gardens
Women
Health
Jobs
Food & Drink
Books
Education
Student
Sunday Times
Site Map
SPECIAL REPORTS
Management Issues
Making Skills Work
European Cities
Arts Power 100
The Art of Travel
Child Welfare
At Your Service
Snapshot of summer
Men's Style
French Film Café
Business Travel
  • Click here for the best of travel


  • Click here for great car deals


  • Click here to find the job for you

RSS
The Times Newspaper Edition
The Sunday Times Newspaper Edition
e-paper
The Times and The Sunday Times electronic paper
The Times and The Sunday Times electronic paper

Britain

The Times September 27, 2005

The Times

Societies worse off 'when they have God on their side'

RELIGIOUS belief can cause damage to a society, contributing towards high murder rates, abortion, sexual promiscuity and suicide, according to research published today.

According to the study, belief in and worship of God are not only unnecessary for a healthy society but may actually contribute to social problems.

The study counters the view of believers that religion is necessary to provide the moral and ethical foundations of a healthy society.

It compares the social peformance of relatively secular countries, such as Britain, with the US, where the majority believes in a creator rather than the theory of evolution. Many conservative evangelicals in the US consider Darwinism to be a social evil, believing that it inspires atheism and amorality.

Many liberal Christians and believers of other faiths hold that religious belief is socially beneficial, believing that it helps to lower rates of violent crime, murder, suicide, sexual promiscuity and abortion. The benefits of religious belief to a society have been described as its “spiritual capital”. But the study claims that the devotion of many in the US may actually contribute to its ills.

The paper, published in the Journal of Religion and Society, a US academic journal, reports: “Many Americans agree that their churchgoing nation is an exceptional, God-blessed, shining city on the hill that stands as an impressive example for an increasingly sceptical world.

“In general, higher rates of belief in and worship of a creator correlate with higher rates of homicide, juvenile and early adult mortality, STD infection rates, teen pregnancy and abortion in the prosperous democracies.

“The United States is almost always the most dysfunctional of the developing democracies, sometimes spectacularly so.”

Gregory Paul, the author of the study and a social scientist, used data from the International Social Survey Programme, Gallup and other research bodies to reach his conclusions.

He compared social indicators such as murder rates, abortion, suicide and teenage pregnancy.

The study concluded that the US was the world’s only prosperous democracy where murder rates were still high, and that the least devout nations were the least dysfunctional. Mr Paul said that rates of gonorrhoea in adolescents in the US were up to 300 times higher than in less devout democratic countries. The US also suffered from “ uniquely high” adolescent and adult syphilis infection rates, and adolescent abortion rates, the study suggested.

Mr Paul said: “The study shows that England, despite the social ills it has, is actually performing a good deal better than the USA in most indicators, even though it is now a much less religious nation than America.”

He said that the disparity was even greater when the US was compared with other countries, including France, Japan and the Scandinavian countries. These nations had been the most successful in reducing murder rates, early mortality, sexually transmitted diseases and abortion, he added.

Mr Paul delayed releasing the study until now because of Hurricane Katrina. He said that the evidence accumulated by a number of different studies suggested that religion might actually contribute to social ills. “I suspect that Europeans are increasingly repelled by the poor societal performance of the Christian states,” he added.

He said that most Western nations would become more religious only if the theory of evolution could be overturned and the existence of God scientifically proven. Likewise, the theory of evolution would not enjoy majority support in the US unless there was a marked decline in religious belief, Mr Paul said.

“The non-religious, proevolution democracies contradict the dictum that a society cannot enjoy good conditions unless most citizens ardently believe in a moral creator.

“The widely held fear that a Godless citizenry must experience societal disaster is therefore refuted.”

Print this article Send to a friend Back to top of page

BREAKING NEWS
Britain from PA
Girls convicted over death of Aimee
'Bitter' parents make bullying plea
'Sex slaves' offered police support
Pandemic 'will seriously affect UK'
Met chief urged Menezes probe delay
OFFER

Free Jean de Florette DVD plus six free DVD rentals worth over £18 when you register for a free trial
In association with Carte Noire
AD FEATURE
Visit Canada in autumn when the trees are a proud riot of oranges, reds and browns
In association with Air Canada
CHARITY SPECIAL
The NSPCC is working to shield children from abuse.
to find out how a small contribution will make a big difference
AD FEATURE
Emperor
Read our review of Emperor: The Field of Swords, Conn Iggulden's historical adventure novel
In association with HarperCollins




MOBILE IMAGING
Get behind the scenes at the Polo Gold Cup and other events this summer
- with Sony Ericsson
THE ART OF TRAVEL
MAKE SKILLS WORK
 ADVERTISEMENT


Contact our advertising team for advertising and sponsorship in Times Online, The Times and The Sunday Times.

Copyright 2005 Times Newspapers Ltd.
This service is provided on Times Newspapers'
standard Terms and Conditions. Please read our Privacy Policy .
To inquire about a licence to reproduce material from The Times, visit the Syndication website.